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Progress Photo Gallery - (Click a photo below to see a larger image)

 

Photograph courtesy of Texarkana Museums System

Women and children were caught up in the excitement of building railroad tracks through the wilderness.


Photograph courtesy of Texarkana Museums System

Generations of frontier women welcomed the coming of the railroads that would bring civilization to their regions.


Photograph courtesy of Texarkana Museums System

The Kansas City Southern baseball team played in the Texarkana City League.


Photograph courtesy of Texarkana Museums System

Texarkana’s first Union Depot was the center of town and the site of many political events.


Photograph courtesy of Texarkana Museums System

Railroad strikes caused Texarkana citizens to lose their jobs and created problems for the local economy.

Photograph courtesy of Texarkana Museums System
Railroad workmen and engines labored to create a path for railroad tracks through the East Texas pine forests.
The Railroad Y.M.C.A. was built near Union Depot on Front Street to provide a “proper” place for railroad men to spend their leisure time. It provided more respectable activities than those found in Swampoodle.

Photograph courtesy of Texarkana Museums System
Railroad employees were proud of their professions and the steady income they provided.

Photograph courtesy of Texarkana Museums System
In the Texarkana railyards were two roundhouses that provided a means of redirecting engines.

Photograph courtesy of Texarkana Museums System
Texarkana was a hub of railroad activity with seventy trains daily and nine separate railroad companies here.
 

Photograph courtesy of Texarkana Museums System

Texarkana’s citizens were constantly on the move bringing in more people and business opportunities.

Photograph courtesy of Texarkana Museums System

 

Photograph courtesy of Texarkana Museums System
Along Front Street on the Texas side of town stood several freight depots. Here is the Cotton Belt depot at the foot of State Street.

Photograph courtesy of Texarkana Museums System
The mighty steam engines fascinated both young and old.

Photograph courtesy of Texarkana Museums System
The engineer’s job was the most glamorous, and perhaps the most dangerous one on the railroad.

Photograph courtesy of Texarkana Museums System
Shiny black paint and crisp white lettering adorn a newly released Texas & Pacific engine.

Photograph courtesy of Texarkana Museums System
In 1971 passenger train service ended in Texarkana for a number of years, until Amtrak service arrived.

Photograph courtesy of Texarkana Museums System
Texarkana yards were a repair facility for the railroads. Mangled trains awaited the skilled hands of local workmen.

Photograph courtesy of Texarkana Museums System
 

Photograph courtesy of Texarkana Museums System
The sudden, headlong meeting of two trains near the Texarkana yards brought citizens pouring out of their homes and businesses to see the damage.

Photograph courtesy of Texarkana Museums System
Five, unidentified railroad executives stand on Engine #300’s cow catcher during the early days of the railroad boom in Texarkana.

Photograph courtesy of Texarkana Museums System
Engine #132 saw decades of railroad service in East Texas in the early 1900s.
 

Photograph courtesy of Texarkana Museums System
The interior of the new Union Depot (1930) featured the very latest in passenger comfort and ease of travel.

Photograph courtesy of Texarkana Museums System
Col. Samuel Fordyce was affiliated with the Texas & St. Louis Railroad.

Photograph courtesy of Texarkana Museums System
Local freight trains carried commodities of all types and were a great boon to the local economy.

Photograph courtesy of Texarkana Museums System
In July of 1913, Texarkana’s Board of Trade took an excursion trip on the Kansas City Southern to Murfreesboro, Arkansas.

Photograph courtesy of Texarkana Museums System
The Texas & Pacific Roundhouse was featured in the 1904 Souvenir of Texarkana.

Photograph courtesy of Texarkana Museums System
Texarkana’s various depots and railroad offices were featured in the 1904 Souvenir of Texarkana.



Photograph courtesy of Texarkana Museums System
From the 1860s to the 1960s, railroads were the lifeblood of the American economy. 

Photograph courtesy of Texarkana Museums System
Many war years’ brides and grooms began their honeymoons with a train trip to Dallas or Little Rock.